Categories
answers

a opening time quiz answers

The answers to a opening time quiz. If you’ve not done it yet, and want to, head over to that page before reading on.

Not long now.

1. Notable as an innovator in the highly specialized and hazardous profession of extinguishing and capping oil well blowouts, how was the American oil well firefighter who contributed to the capping of the biggest oil well blowout to have occurred in the North Sea at the Ekofisk Bravo platform In 1977 commonly known?

(Paul Neal) “Red” Adair

2. What was the name of the Royal Navy flagship that defeated the Spanish Armada in 1588? The name has been used for Goth other navy ships since then.

Ark Royal

3. Born in 1911, who was the American burlesque entertainer and vedette famous for her striptease act? She was also an actress, author, and playwright and her 1957 memoir was adapted into a stage musical in 1959.

Gypsy Rose Lee

4. Which children’s book, by Edith Nesbit , was originally serialised in The London Magazine during 1905 and first published in book form in 1906? It has been adapted for the screen several times, of which the 1970 film version is the best known.

The Railway Children

5. Which song, by the Jimi Hendrix Experience, first appeared on their 1967 debut album Are You Experienced and was later issued as their third single in the U.S?

Foxey Lady

6. Born in 2015 to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, who is currently 4th in line to the throne?

Princess Charlotte

7. What BBC TV programme featured annual snooker tournamnets and ran from 1969 to 1986?

Pot Black

8. Which former Prussion and later German military decoration design was a black symbol with a whit or silver outlinederived from a design used by knights on occasions from the 13th century?

Iron Cross

9. Which British telecommunications and internet service provider based in Maidenhead, England launched on 3 March 2003 as the United Kingdom’s first commercial 100% 3G network?

3

10. Which British sitcom produced by Thames Television, first aired between 1976 and 1979, was a spin-off from Man About the House and starred Brian Murphy and Yootha Joyce as constantly-sparring married couple?

George and Mildred

11. What animal are George and Joy Adamson most famously associated with?

Lion

12. In what type of tree, in Shropshire, did the future King of England, Charles II, reportedly hide from Roundhead soldiers during the English Civil War.

Oak

13. Which paint manufacturer’s range boost colors such as botanical noir, croquet, chaise lounge, looking glass and key lime pie?

Crown

14. What is the name of the official charity for recreational cricket and the UK’s leading youth cricket and disability sports charity, its charitable objective is to ‘give young people a sporting chance’?

Lord’s Taverners

15. What type of dog is a hunting dog used by hunters to track or chase prey?

Hound

16. The bowhead, Andrew’s beaked and the false killer are all types of what animal?

Whales

17. There are 46 species of small marine fish in the genus Hippocampus, what is a Hippocampus?

Sea Horse

18. What can be pieces of information that control the operation of a cryptography algorithm; a device used to control access to places or facilities restricted by a lock or a guide to a map’s symbology?

Keys

19. Which game is played between two people and has two throwing targets, or stakes, set in a lawn or sandbox area which are traditionally placed 40 feet apart?

Horseshoes

20. In J.R.R. Tolkein’s 1937 novel The Hobbit, what was Smaug?

A dragon

Joining answers 1-10 with 11-12 gives you 10 of the most common pub names on the UK:

  • Red Lion
  • Royal Oak
  • Rose & Crown
  • Railway Tavern
  • Fox & Hounds
  • Prince of Wales
  • Black Horse
  • Cross Keys
  • Three Horseshoes
  • George & Dragon
Categories
quiz

a opening time quiz

It’s Sunday, week 399 of lockdown, or so it seems. Which means yet another week of no Fagan’s theme quiz. But, maybe not for much longer!

This week, we’ve all been wondering how a real pub works.

Its the usual 20 questions, again. You can almost believe you are with 20,000 people standing in pub.

This week, it’s a quiz of two halves again! You know the score!!

There may be some “sound-a-likes” and embedded words.

The use of electronic devices to divine the answers, with the exception of hearing aids and pacemakers, is forbidden.

Not long now.

1. Notable as an innovator in the highly specialized and hazardous profession of extinguishing and capping oil well blowouts, how was the American oil well firefighter who contributed to the capping of the biggest oil well blowout to have occurred in the North Sea at the Ekofisk Bravo platform In 1977 commonly known?

2. What was the name of the Royal Navy flagship that defeated the Spanish Armada in 1588? The name has been used for Goth other navy ships since then.

3. Born in 1911, who was the American burlesque entertainer and vedette famous for her striptease act? She was also an actress, author, and playwright and her 1957 memoir was adapted into a stage musical in 1959.

4. Which children’s book, by Edith Nesbit , was originally serialised in The London Magazine during 1905 and first published in book form in 1906? It has been adapted for the screen several times, of which the 1970 film version is the best known.

5. Which song, by the Jimi Hendrix Experience, first appeared on their 1967 debut album Are You Experienced and was later issued as their third single in the U.S?

6. Born in 2015 to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, who is currently 4th in line to the throne?

7. What BBC TV programme featured annual snooker tournamnets and ran from 1969 to 1986?

8. Which former Prussion and later German military decoration design was a black symbol with a whit or silver outlinederived from a design used by knights on occasions from the 13th century?

9. Which British telecommunications and internet service provider based in Maidenhead, England launched on 3 March 2003 as the United Kingdom’s first commercial 100% 3G network?

10. Which British sitcom produced by Thames Television, first aired between 1976 and 1979, was a spin-off from Man About the House and starred Brian Murphy and Yootha Joyce as constantly-sparring married couple?

11. What animal are George and Joy Adamson most famously associated with?

12. In what type of tree, in Shropshire, did the future King of England, Charles II, reportedly hide from Roundhead soldiers during the English Civil War.

13. Which paint manufacturer’s range boost colors such as botanical noir, croquet, chaise lounge, looking glass and key lime pie?

14. What is the name of the official charity for recreational cricket and the UK’s leading youth cricket and disability sports charity, its charitable objective is to ‘give young people a sporting chance’?

15. What type of dog is a hunting dog used by hunters to track or chase prey?

16. The bowhead, Andrew’s beaked and the false killer are all types of what animal?

17. There are 46 species of small marine fish in the genus Hippocampus, what is a Hippocampus?

18. What can be pieces of information that control the operation of a cryptography algorithm; a device used to control access to places or facilities restricted by a lock or a guide to a map’s symbology?

19. Which game is played between two people and has two throwing targets, or stakes, set in a lawn or sandbox area which are traditionally placed 40 feet apart?

20. In J.R.R. Tolkein’s 1937 novel The Hobbit, what was Smaug?

Categories
answers

a performing arts festival quiz answers

The answers to a performing arts festival quiz. If you’ve not done it yet, and want to, head over to that page before reading on.

The back room (again).

1. What technical drawing instrument is used by draftsmen primarily as a guide for drawing horizontal lines on a drafting table, its name derives from its shape?

T square

2. Born in 1942, who was the English journalist and broadcaster who was a newscaster for ITN before becoming the presenter of the BBC’s Question Time between 1989 and 1993, and a presenter of the BBC Nine O’Clock News and Ten O’Clock News between 1993 and 2003?

Peter Sissons

3. Which sports commentator gave his name to a phenomenon common among sports commentators of allowing sentences to leave their mouth without letting their brain decide if they made sense with lines such as “If that had gone in, it would have been a goal” and “The front wheel crosses the finish line, closely followed by the back wheel”?

David Coleman

4. What is the name of the South Lakeland village in Cumbria with one primary school and four pubs that is also the name of a chain of outdoor clothing stores?

Hawkshead

5. Who was the singer and actor, one of the most significant cultural icons of the 20th century, who was managed by the former carnival barker Colonel Tom Patker and only ever performed in North America despite an estimated 40% of his sales being outside the United States?

Elvis Presley

6. Which invention, generally attributed to Guglielmo Marconi in the 1890s, actually spanned many decades, from theoretical underpinnings, through proof of the phenomenon’s existence, development of technical means, to its final use in signalling?

Radio

7. Which TV series, one of the most successful of the 1970s, portrayed an idealized vision of life in the mid-1950s to mid-1960s Midwestern United States, and centered around the Cunningham family and their “over the garage” lodger Arthur Fonzarelli?

Happy Days

8. Which 1963 Cold War spy novel by the British author John le Carré depicts Alec Leamas, a British agent, being sent to East Germany as a faux defector to sow disinformation about a powerful East German intelligence officer?

The Spy Who Came In From the Cold

9. What is the geographic region spreading around the North Pole, that technically has no single correct definition as the southern boundary varies depending on the method used to describe the area?

Arctic

10. What was the name of the student housemate played by Nigel Planer in the anarchic 1980s TV show The Young Ones?

Neil

11. According to the “science” of phrenology, an individual’s character and abilities can be deduced from the size and shape of various bumps on which part of the body?

Head

12. After 16-year-old Brenda Ann Spencer fired at children in a school playground in San Diego, California, on 29 January 1979, killing two adults and injuring eight children and one police office, what reason did she remorselessly give for her actions?

I don’t like Mondays. This livens up the day

13. Which children’s TV programme featured the characters Poppy, Jemima, Humpty, Little Ted and Big Ted and aired from April 1964 until March 1988?

Play School

14. Which American popular beat combo were originally active between 1966 and 1971 with a line-up that consisted of American and English actor/musicians and were conceived specifically for a TV situation comedy series?

The Monkees

15. Who became the youngest prime minister of Great Britain in 1783 at the age of 24 and the first prime minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in January 1801?

William Pitt the Younger

16. What is the Latin word that means “king” in English and it’s also the name of the dinosaur in the Toy Story films?

Rex

17. In the three Abrahamic religions – Judaism, Christianity and Islam – which one of the archangels was employed to announce the birth of John the Baptist to Zechariah and to announce the birth of Jesus to the Virgin Mary?

Gabriel

18. What type of knife is a fixed-blade fighting knife created by James Black in the early 19th century and named after the fighter it was designed for who had become famous for his use of a large knife at a duel known as the Sandbar Fight?

Bowie knife

19. The speed of what can be measured using a tool called an anemometer?

Wind

20. Who were the American comedy duo whose work on radio and in film and television made them the most popular comedy team of the 1940s and early 1950s and the highest-paid entertainers in the world during World War II?

Abbott and Costello


Combining the answers, you get the following Glastonbury Festival headliners:

  • T-Rex (1970)
  • Peter Gabriel (1979/1994)
  • David Bowie (1971/2000)
  • Hawkwind (1981)
  • Elvis Costello (1987/1989/1994)
  • Radiohead (1997/2003/2017)
  • Happy Mondays (1990)
  • Coldplay (2002/2011/2016)
  • Arctic Monkeys (2007/2013)
  • Neil Young (2009)
Categories
quiz

a performing arts festival quiz

It’s Sunday, week 301 of lockdown, or so it seems. Which means yet another week of no Fagan’s theme quiz.

This week, as we’ve all been camped in the garden watching headline sets on iPlayer the theme nods its head to the Glastonbury Festival.

Its the usual 20 questions, again. You can almost believe you are with 20,000 people standing in a field in.

This week, it’s a quiz of two halves again! You know the score!!

There may be some “sound-a-likes” and embedded words.

The use of electronic devices to divine the answers, with the exception of hearing aids and pacemakers, is forbidden.

The back room (again).

1. What technical drawing instrument is used by draftsmen primarily as a guide for drawing horizontal lines on a drafting table, its name derives from its shape?

2. Born in 1942, who was the English journalist and broadcaster who was a newscaster for ITN before becoming the presenter of the BBC’s Question Time between 1989 and 1993, and a presenter of the BBC Nine O’Clock News and Ten O’Clock News between 1993 and 2003?

3. Which sports commentator gave his name to a phenomenon common among sports commentators of allowing sentences to leave their mouth without letting their brain decide if they made sense with lines such as “If that had gone in, it would have been a goal” and “The front wheel crosses the finish line, closely followed by the back wheel”?

4. What is the name of the South Lakeland village in Cumbria with one primary school and four pubs that is also the name of a chain of outdoor clothing stores?

5. Who was the singer and actor, one of the most significant cultural icons of the 20th century, who was managed by the former carnival barker Colonel Tom Patker and only ever performed in North America despite an estimated 40% of his sales being outside the United States?

6. Which invention, generally attributed to Guglielmo Marconi in the 1890s, actually spanned many decades, from theoretical underpinnings, through proof of the phenomenon’s existence, development of technical means, to its final use in signalling?

7. Which TV series, one of the most successful of the 1970s, portrayed an idealized vision of life in the mid-1950s to mid-1960s Midwestern United States, and centered around the Cunningham family and their “over the garage” lodger Arthur Fonzarelli?

8. Which 1963 Cold War spy novel by the British author John le Carré depicts Alec Leamas, a British agent, being sent to East Germany as a faux defector to sow disinformation about a powerful East German intelligence officer?

9. What is the geographic region spreading around the North Pole, that technically has no single correct definition as the southern boundary varies depending on the method used to describe the area?

10. What was the name of the student housemate played by Nigel Planer in the anarchic 1980s TV show The Young Ones?

11. According to the “science” of phrenology, an individual’s character and abilities can be deduced from the size and shape of various bumps on which part of the body?

12. After 16-year-old Brenda Ann Spencer fired at children in a school playground in San Diego, California, on 29 January 1979, killing two adults and injuring eight children and one police office, what reason did she remorselessly give for her actions?

13. Which children’s TV programme featured the characters Poppy, Jemima, Humpty, Little Ted and Big Ted and aired from April 1964 until March 1988?

14. Which American popular beat combo were originally active between 1966 and 1971 with a line-up that consisted of American and English actor/musicians and were conceived specifically for a TV situation comedy series?

15. Who became the youngest prime minister of Great Britain in 1783 at the age of 24 and the first prime minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in January 1801?

16. What is the Latin word that means “king” in English and it’s also the name of the dinosaur in the Toy Story films?

17. In the three Abrahamic religions – Judaism, Christianity and Islam – which one of the archangels was employed to announce the birth of John the Baptist to Zechariah and to announce the birth of Jesus to the Virgin Mary?

18. What type of knife is a fixed-blade fighting knife created by James Black in the early 19th century and named after the fighter it was designed for who had become famous for his use of a large knife at a duel known as the Sandbar Fight?

19. The speed of what can be measured using a tool called an anemometer?

20. Who were the American comedy duo whose work on radio and in film and television made them the most popular comedy team of the 1940s and early 1950s and the highest-paid entertainers in the world during World War II?

Categories
answers

a football’s back quiz answers

The answers to a footballs back quiz. If you’ve not done it yet, and want to, head over to that page before reading on.

The main room (again).

1. Who was the Welshman who became  the first-ever BDO World Professional Darts Champion in 1978?  Nicknamed Marathon Man, he competed during the 1970s and 1980s and achieved World Number 1 status before retiring from the game in 1991.

Leighton Rees

2. Which town, in Lancashire, England and close to Blackburn and Burnley, is a former centre of the cotton and textile machinery industries and famed for manufacturing the hardest and densest building bricks in the world?

Accrington

3. What is given, traditionally, as a gift for a 15th Wedding Anniversary?

Crystal

4. With a layout similar to that of an amphitheatre, what is the capital city of Haiti?

Port-au-Prince

5. Which English city grew initially as a market town specialising in the woollen trade, in the Industrial Revolution became a major centre for coal mining, steel production, lock making, and the manufacture of cars and motorcycles and is named after its Anglo-Saxon noble woman founder, Wulfrun?

Wolverhampton

6. Dating from the mid 20th century in the UK, what phrase is used to refer to a person who had died or an item that was broken?

Gone for a burton

7. What can be a man’s stiff felt hat with dome-shaped crown and narrow brim or a race open to all comers or to a specified category of contestant?

Derby

8. In 1620, the Pilgrim Fathers departed from where for the New World to establish the second English settlement in what is now the United States of America?

Plymouth

9. After beginning his career as a singer, who went on to work as a DJ for the offshore pirate radio stations Radio Caroline and Radio London between 1964 and 1967, before joining the BBC?

Tony Blackburn

10. Officially opened in April 1966, but had been a school and college before that, what is the name of the university in the UK midlands that has more than 70% of its students take a placement year, the highest percentage in the UK?

Aston

11. Who were the Italian-American gang vying for respect on the streets of the Bronx in 1963 with rivals such as the Ducky Boys and the Fordham Baldies in the 1979 movie of the same name? 

The Wanderers

12. Which domestic sports competition officially began in 1890, but unofficially has been played in one form or another since 1709?

County Championship (County cricket)

13. Noted for its  ceremonial Hall of Mirrors, the jewel-like Royal Opera , and the royal apartments,  what  was the name of the principal royal residence of France from 1682  until the start of the French Revolution in 1789?

Palace of Versaille

14. What was the full name,  announced at the start of every episode, of Ronnie Barker’s character in the 1970s TV comedy Porridge?

Normal Stanley Fletcher

15. Born José Doroteo Arango Arámbula in 1878, how is the Mexican revolutionary general and one of the most prominent figures of the Mexican Revolution more commonly known? 

(Francisco) “Pancho” Villa

16. It is the name or part of the name of many places throughout the world but what is also a pattern made of diamonds or lozenges? The word is sometimes used to refer to an individual diamond in the design, but more commonly refers to the overall pattern.

Argyle

17. Designed by husband and wife David and Elizabeth Emanuel, what did Princess Diana wear on 29th July 1981 that was 153 yards long? 

Veil

18. Who would walk long distances to take livestock to market—usually on foot and often with the aid of dogs?

Drovers

19. Which  long-distance passenger train service was created in 1883 by Compagnie Internationale des Wagons-Lits? The  route and rolling stock of the service has changed many times and, although originally it was simply a normal international railway service, the name has become synonymous with intrigue and luxury travel.

Orient Express

20. What was the name of the British soap opera, set in a covered market in Salford, in the northwest of England that was intended as a companion to fellow ITV soap Coronation Street? Due to continued troubles and ratings competition from the BBC’s Open All Hours, the series was only broadcast for one year.

Albion Market


Combining the answers, you get the following UK football teams:

  • Leyton Orient
  • Accrington Stanley
  • Crystal Palace
  • Port Vale
  • Wolverhampton Wanderers
  • Burton Albion
  • Derby County
  • Plymouth Argile
  • Blackburn Rovers
  • Aston Villa
Categories
quiz

a football’s back quiz

It’s Sunday, week 256 of lockdown, or so it seems. Which means yet another week of no Fagan’s theme quiz.

This week, to celebrate the return of the so called beautiful game we have a football theme.

Its the usual 20 questions, again. You can almost believe you are in Fagan’s on a Sunday.

This week, it’s a quiz of two halves again! You know the score!!

There may be some “sound-a-likes” and embedded words.

The use of electronic devices to divine the answers, with the exception of hearing aids and pacemakers, is forbidden.

The main room (again).

1. Who was the Welshman who became  the first-ever BDO World Professional Darts Champion in 1978?  Nicknamed Marathon Man, he competed during the 1970s and 1980s and achieved World Number 1 status before retiring from the game in 1991.

2. Which town, in Lancashire, England and close to Blackburn and Burnley, is a former centre of the cotton and textile machinery industries and famed for manufacturing the hardest and densest building bricks in the world?

3. What is given, traditionally, as a gift for a 15th Wedding Anniversary?

4. With a layout similar to that of an amphitheatre, what is the capital city of Haiti?

5. Which English city grew initially as a market town specialising in the woollen trade, in the Industrial Revolution became a major centre for coal mining, steel production, lock making, and the manufacture of cars and motorcycles and is named after its Anglo-Saxon noble woman founder, Wulfrun?

6. Dating from the mid 20th century in the UK, what phrase is used to refer to a person who had died or an item that was broken?

7. What can be a man’s stiff felt hat with dome-shaped crown and narrow brim or a race open to all comers or to a specified category of contestant? 

8. In 1620, the Pilgrim Fathers departed from where for the New World to establish the second English settlement in what is now the United States of America?

9. After beginning his career as a singer, who went on to work as a DJ for the offshore pirate radio stations Radio Caroline and Radio London between 1964 and 1967, before joining the BBC?

10. Officially opened in April 1966, but had been a school and college before that, what is the name of the university in the UK midlands that has more than 70% of its students take a placement year, the highest percentage in the UK?

11. Who were the Italian-American gang vying for respect on the streets of the Bronx in 1963 with rivals such as the Ducky Boys and the Fordham Baldies in the 1979 movie of the same name? 

12. Which domestic sports competition officially began in 1890, but unofficially has been played in one form or another since 1709?

13. Noted for its  ceremonial Hall of Mirrors, the jewel-like Royal Opera , and the royal apartments,  what  was the name of the principal royal residence of France from 1682  until the start of the French Revolution in 1789?

14. What was the full name,  announced at the start of every episode, of Ronnie Barker’s character in the 1970s TV comedy Porridge?

15. Born José Doroteo Arango Arámbula in 1878, how is the Mexican revolutionary general and one of the most prominent figures of the Mexican Revolution more commonly known? 

16. It is the name or part of the name of many places throughout the world but what is also a pattern made of diamonds or lozenges? The word is sometimes used to refer to an individual diamond in the design, but more commonly refers to the overall pattern.

17. Designed by husband and wife David and Elizabeth Emanuel, what did Princess Diana wear on 29th July 1981 that was 153 yards long? 

18. Who would walk long distances to take livestock to market—usually on foot and often with the aid of dogs?

19. Which  long-distance passenger train service was created in 1883 by Compagnie Internationale des Wagons-Lits? The  route and rolling stock of the service has changed many times and, although originally it was simply a normal international railway service, the name has become synonymous with intrigue and luxury travel.

20. What was the name of the British soap opera, set in a covered market in Salford, in the northwest of England that was intended as a companion to fellow ITV soap Coronation Street? Due to continued troubles and ratings competition from the BBC’s Open All Hours, the series was only broadcast for one year.

Categories
answers

a shop till you drop quiz answers

The answers to a shop till you drop quiz. If you’ve not done it yet, and want to, head over to that page before reading on.

The bar (again)

1. Which philosopher best-known titles are the 1848 pamphlet, The Communist Manifesto, and the three-volume Das Kapital?

Karl Marx

2. What is a small, non-vascular flowerless plants that typically form dense green clumps or mats, often in damp or shady locations?

Moss

3. Which animal is the second largest student in the world and have it’s name to the branch of Boy Scouts aged 6 to 8?

Beaver

4. What is the name of the sentient computer in Arthur C Clarke’s film “2001: A Space Odyssey”?

HAL

5. A thousand years of yellow, white and purple carrot history was wiped out in a generation in the 17th century by growers from which country when they cultivated orange carrots as a tribute to William of Orange?

Holland

6. What is the often used abbreviation for the Tennessee whiskey that is the top selling American whiskey in the world?

JD

7. Who was the English humanitarian and author who was kidnapped and held captive from 1987 to 1991 during his effort to secure the release of four hostages in Lebanon?

Terry Waite

8. Born in 1947, which flamboyant pop star was born Reginald Kenneth Dwight?

Elton John

9. Which Central American country’s capital is San Jose?

Costa Rica

10. What name is shared by a Leeds United and Scotland goalkeeper and a British show jumping champion, both competing at the top level in their chosen sports in the 70s?

Harvey (David Harvey/Harvey Smith)

11. What is the name of the accident prone lead character who is married to Berry and has a daughter named Jessica in a 1973 British sitcom?

Frank Spencer

12. Octopush, Hobbyhorsing, Ferret Legging and Shin Kicking are all what sort of activity?

Sports

13. Twin brothers Matt and Luke Goss formed which band in 1986 with their friends Craig Logan? Their first major success was the number 2 hit “When Will I Be Famous?”

Bros

14. Which actress is best known for her role as Else Garnett, the long-suffering wife of the racially bigoted and misogynistic character Alf Garnett in the BBC sitcom Till Death Us Do Part?

Dandy Nichols

15. What is a small cap, akin to the biretta, worn in the Middle Ages by soldiers and ecclesiastics​ and also the name of a house building company in the UK?

Barrett

16. What is the name of the northern part of the largest island of the Outer Hebrides archipelago in Scotland, frequently referred to as if it was a separate islands?

Lewis

17. Which American director, writer, actor, comedian, producer and composer’s films include The Producers, Blazing Saddles and Spaceballs?

Mel Brooks

18. What is Finland the largest drinker of (per capita), beating neighbouring Norway in to second place?

Coffee

19. What are shallow places with good footing where a river or stream may be crossed by wading, or inside a vehicle getting its wheels wet?

Fords

20. What collective name is given to the series of English civil wars that lasted through many sporadic episodes between 1455 and 1487?

War of the Roses


When combined, the answers give the following shops:

  • Marks & Spencer
  • Moss Bros
  • Beaverbrooks
  • Halfords
  • Holland & Barrett
  • JD Sports
  • Waitrose
  • John Lewis
  • Costa Coffee
  • Harvey Nichols
Categories
quiz

a shop till you drop quiz

It’s Sunday, week 234 of lockdown, or so it seems. Which means yet another week of no Fagan’s theme quiz. We had some rain this week? End of news report.

The theme this week is in anticipation of tomorrow when everything returns to normal and people go shopping. Maybe?

Its the usual 20 questions, again. This week, I’m pretending not to remember that I can’t remember what the inside of Fagan’s looks like.

The theme is a quiz of two halves. Answers to questions 11-20 relate to answers to questions 1-10 in some way. If there’s a pattern, it’s unintentional.

There may be some “sound-a-likes” and embedded words.

The use of electronic devices to divine the answers, with the exception of hearing aids and pacemakers, is forbidden.

The bar (again)

1. Which philosopher best-known titles are the 1848 pamphlet, The Communist Manifesto, and the three-volume Das Kapital?

2. What is a small, non-vascular flowerless plants that typically form dense green clumps or mats, often in damp or shady locations?

3. Which animal is the second largest student in the world and have it’s name to the branch of Boy Scouts aged 6 to 8?

4. What is the name of the sentient computer in Arthur C Clarke’s film “2001: A Space Odyssey”?

5. A thousand years of yellow, white and purple carrot history was wiped out in a generation in the 17th century by growers from which country when they cultivated orange carrots as a tribute to William of Orange?

6. What is the often used abbreviation for the Tennessee whiskey that is the top selling American whiskey in the world?

7. Who was the English humanitarian and author who was kidnapped and held captive from 1987 to 1991 during his effort to secure the release of four hostages in Lebanon?

8. Born in 1947, which flamboyant pop star was born Reginald Kenneth Dwight?

9. Which Central American country’s capital is San Jose?

10. What name is shared by a Leeds United and Scotland goalkeeper and a British show jumping champion, both competing at the top level in their chosen sports in the 70s?

11. What is the name of the accident prone lead character who is married to Berry and has a daughter named Jessica in a 1973 British sitcom?

12. Octopush, Hobbyhorsing, Ferret Legging and Shin Kicking are all what sort of activity?

13. Twin brothers Matt and Luke Goss formed which band in 1986 with their friends Craig Logan? Their first major success was the number 2 hit “When Will I Be Famous?”

14. Which actress is best known for her role as Else Garnett, the long-suffering wife of the racially bigoted and misogynistic character Alf Garnett in the BBC sitcom Till Death Us Do Part?

15. What is a small cap, akin to the biretta, worn in the Middle Ages by soldiers and ecclesiastics​ and also the name of a house building company in the UK?

16. What is the name of the northern part of the largest island of the Outer Hebrides archipelago in Scotland, frequently referred to as if it was a separate islands?

17. Which American director, writer, actor, comedian, producer and composer’s films include The Producers, Blazzing Saddles and Spaceballs?

18. What is Finland the largest drinker of (per capita), beating neighbouring Norway in to second place?

19. What are shallow places with good footing where a river or stream may be crossed by wading, or inside a vehicle getting its wheels wet?

20. What colective name is given to the series of English civile wars that lasted through many sporadic episodes between 1455 and 1487?

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answers

a it’s not unusual quiz answers

The answers to a it’s not unusual quiz. If you’ve not done it yet, and want to, head over to that page before reading on.

The Snog, Fagan's, Sheffield

The Snog (again)

1. Best known for its 161 theatrical short films by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, which animated series centres on a friendship/rivalry (a love-hate relationship) between a cat, and a mouse?

Tom & Jerry

2. What is  the most widespread surname in Wales, borne by 5.75% of the population? 

Jones

3. Who are the  two incompetent detectives  in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé who provide much of the comic relief throughout the series?

Thompson & Thomson

4.What is the name of the Welsh footballer, born in 1965, who is famous for his “hard man” image? He has also appeared in films, such as Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, often typecast as criminal or villain characters.

Vinnie Jones

5. Who were founded by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman and controlled much of Southeastern Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries?

Ottomans

6. By what name is the event that  occurred in a  settlement in the South American nation of Guyana  on November 18, 1978, when more than 900 members of an American cult called the Peoples Temple died in a mass suicide-murder under the direction of their leader, commonly known?

Jonestown Massacre

7. Which character in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream provides comic relief throughout the play? A weaver by trade, he is famously known for getting his head transformed into that of a donkey by the elusive Puck.

Bottom

8. Whose catchphrases are “Don’t panic!”, “Permission to speak, sir?” and “They don’t like it up ’em!”, in a BBC TV sitcom that originally aired between 1968 and 1977?

Lance Corporal Jack Jone

9. What is the name of the South African instrumental kwela song that originally charted in the UK in 1958 and later, as a cover with added lyrics by Brighton based punk band The Piranhas in 1980?

Tom Hark

10. What are you said to be doing if you compare and attempt to emulate one’s neighbour’s social class or accumulation of material goods?

Keeping up with the Joneses

11. What is the former name of the British motoring association founded in 1905, now known simply by the initials of its old name?

Automobile Association

12. Born in 1930, which actress was most famous for starring in all 20 Carry On… films and also appeared in British TV sitcoms On the Up and As Time Goes By?

Joan Sims

13. How is the sensation that an amputated or missing limb is still attached usually known?

Phantom limb

14. First name Edwin, by what name is the driver of the title character more commonly known in the cut out animation television series Ivor the Engine?

Jones the Steam

15. The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s that uses a timer to break down work into intervals, named after the kitchen timer that he used as a university student. What food was his kitchen timer designed to resemble?

Tomato

16. Which imperfect piece of cockney rhyming slang appears to derive from the music hall song ’E Dunno Where ’E Are and means to be alone?

Jack Jones

17. Originating in Southern Italy as a lottery-style board game, but a variation of which is a popular form of raffle in the UK and elsewhere. What is it?

Tombola

18. By what name did sailors refer to the bottom of the seas, often in relation to drowned sailors and shipwrecks?

Davey Jones’ Locker

19. Create in the UK in 1991, what is the name of the theatrical percussion group that uses the body and ordinary objects to create a physical theatre performance using rhythms, acrobatics and pantomime?

Stomp

20. What was the title of the 1998 hit recorded by popular beat combo Space with guest vocalist Cerys Mathews of Catatonia fame?

The Ballad Of Tom Jones

Categories
quiz

a it’s not unusual quiz

It’s Sunday, week 199 of lockdown, or so it seems. Which means yet another week of no Fagan’s theme quiz. What? You do remember Fagan’s don’t you?

This week, the theme is taken form the fact that today (Sunday 7th) is the 80th birthday of an internationally famous Welsh singer. I think you’ll be able to work out who this is and what the them is pretty quickly.

Its the usual 20 questions, again. This week, I’m imagining Fagan’s – but it’s a bit of a hazy memory these days.

The theme alternates – blah, blah, blah.

There may be some “sound-a-likes” and embedded words.

The use of electronic devices to divine the answers, with the exception of hearing aids and pacemakers, is forbidden.

The Snog, Fagan's, Sheffield

The Snog (again)

1. Best known for its 161 theatrical short films by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, which animated series centres on a friendship/rivalry (a love-hate relationship) between a cat, and a mouse?

2. What is  the most   widespread surname   in Wales, borne by 5.75% of the population? 

3. Who are the  two incompetent detectives  in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé who provide much of the comic relief throughout the series?

4.What is the name of the Welsh footballer, born in 1965, who is famous for his “hard man” image? He has also appeared in films, such as Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, often typecast as criminal or villain characters.

5. Who were founded by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman and controlled much of Southeastern Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries?

6. By what name is the event that  occurred in a  settlement in the South American nation of Guyana  on November 18, 1978, when more than 900 members of an American cult called the Peoples Temple died in a mass suicide-murder under the direction of their leader, commonly known?

7. Which character in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream provides comic relief throughout the play? A weaver by trade, he is famously known for getting his head transformed into that of a donkey by the elusive Puck.

8. Whose catchphrases are “Don’t panic!”, “Permission to speak, sir?” and “They don’t like it up ’em!”, in a BBC TV sitcom that originally aired between 1968 and 1977?

9. What is the name of the South African instrumental kwela song that originally charted in the UK in 1958 and later, as a cover with added lyrics by Brighton based punk band The Piranhas in 1980?

10. What are you said to be doing if you compare and attempt to emulate one’s neighbour’s social class or accumulation of material goods?

11. What is the former name of the British motoring association founded in 1905, now known simply by the initials of its old name?

12. Born in 1930, which actress was most famous for starring in all 20 Carry On… films and also appeared in British TV sitcoms On the Up and As Time Goes By?

13. How is the sensation that an amputated or missing limb is still attached usually known?

14. First name Edwin, by what name is the driver of the title character more commonly known in the cut out animation television series Ivor the Engine?

15. The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s that uses a timer to break down work into intervals, named after the kitchen timer that he used as a university student. What food was his kitchen timer designed to resemble?

16. Which imperfect piece of cockney rhyming slang appears to derive from the music hall song ’E Dunno Where ’E Are and means to be alone?

17. Originating in Southern Italy as a lottery-style board game, but a variation of which is a popular form of raffle in the UK and elsewhere. What is it?

18. By what name did sailors refer to the bottom of the seas, often in relation to drowned sailors and shipwrecks?

19. Create in the UK in 1991, what is the name of the theatrical percussion group that uses the body and ordinary objects to create a physical theatre performance using rhythms, acrobatics and pantomime?

20. What was the title of the 1998 hit recorded by popular beat combo Space with guest vocalist Cerys Mathews of Catatonia fame?