Categories
answers

a shop till you drop quiz answers

The answers to a shop till you drop quiz. If you’ve not done it yet, and want to, head over to that page before reading on.

The bar (again)

1. Which philosopher best-known titles are the 1848 pamphlet, The Communist Manifesto, and the three-volume Das Kapital?

Karl Marx

2. What is a small, non-vascular flowerless plants that typically form dense green clumps or mats, often in damp or shady locations?

Moss

3. Which animal is the second largest student in the world and have it’s name to the branch of Boy Scouts aged 6 to 8?

Beaver

4. What is the name of the sentient computer in Arthur C Clarke’s film “2001: A Space Odyssey”?

HAL

5. A thousand years of yellow, white and purple carrot history was wiped out in a generation in the 17th century by growers from which country when they cultivated orange carrots as a tribute to William of Orange?

Holland

6. What is the often used abbreviation for the Tennessee whiskey that is the top selling American whiskey in the world?

JD

7. Who was the English humanitarian and author who was kidnapped and held captive from 1987 to 1991 during his effort to secure the release of four hostages in Lebanon?

Terry Waite

8. Born in 1947, which flamboyant pop star was born Reginald Kenneth Dwight?

Elton John

9. Which Central American country’s capital is San Jose?

Costa Rica

10. What name is shared by a Leeds United and Scotland goalkeeper and a British show jumping champion, both competing at the top level in their chosen sports in the 70s?

Harvey (David Harvey/Harvey Smith)

11. What is the name of the accident prone lead character who is married to Berry and has a daughter named Jessica in a 1973 British sitcom?

Frank Spencer

12. Octopush, Hobbyhorsing, Ferret Legging and Shin Kicking are all what sort of activity?

Sports

13. Twin brothers Matt and Luke Goss formed which band in 1986 with their friends Craig Logan? Their first major success was the number 2 hit “When Will I Be Famous?”

Bros

14. Which actress is best known for her role as Else Garnett, the long-suffering wife of the racially bigoted and misogynistic character Alf Garnett in the BBC sitcom Till Death Us Do Part?

Dandy Nichols

15. What is a small cap, akin to the biretta, worn in the Middle Ages by soldiers and ecclesiastics​ and also the name of a house building company in the UK?

Barrett

16. What is the name of the northern part of the largest island of the Outer Hebrides archipelago in Scotland, frequently referred to as if it was a separate islands?

Lewis

17. Which American director, writer, actor, comedian, producer and composer’s films include The Producers, Blazing Saddles and Spaceballs?

Mel Brooks

18. What is Finland the largest drinker of (per capita), beating neighbouring Norway in to second place?

Coffee

19. What are shallow places with good footing where a river or stream may be crossed by wading, or inside a vehicle getting its wheels wet?

Fords

20. What collective name is given to the series of English civil wars that lasted through many sporadic episodes between 1455 and 1487?

War of the Roses


When combined, the answers give the following shops:

  • Marks & Spencer
  • Moss Bros
  • Beaverbrooks
  • Halfords
  • Holland & Barrett
  • JD Sports
  • Waitrose
  • John Lewis
  • Costa Coffee
  • Harvey Nichols
Categories
quiz

a shop till you drop quiz

It’s Sunday, week 234 of lockdown, or so it seems. Which means yet another week of no Fagan’s theme quiz. We had some rain this week? End of news report.

The theme this week is in anticipation of tomorrow when everything returns to normal and people go shopping. Maybe?

Its the usual 20 questions, again. This week, I’m pretending not to remember that I can’t remember what the inside of Fagan’s looks like.

The theme is a quiz of two halves. Answers to questions 11-20 relate to answers to questions 1-10 in some way. If there’s a pattern, it’s unintentional.

There may be some “sound-a-likes” and embedded words.

The use of electronic devices to divine the answers, with the exception of hearing aids and pacemakers, is forbidden.

The bar (again)

1. Which philosopher best-known titles are the 1848 pamphlet, The Communist Manifesto, and the three-volume Das Kapital?

2. What is a small, non-vascular flowerless plants that typically form dense green clumps or mats, often in damp or shady locations?

3. Which animal is the second largest student in the world and have it’s name to the branch of Boy Scouts aged 6 to 8?

4. What is the name of the sentient computer in Arthur C Clarke’s film “2001: A Space Odyssey”?

5. A thousand years of yellow, white and purple carrot history was wiped out in a generation in the 17th century by growers from which country when they cultivated orange carrots as a tribute to William of Orange?

6. What is the often used abbreviation for the Tennessee whiskey that is the top selling American whiskey in the world?

7. Who was the English humanitarian and author who was kidnapped and held captive from 1987 to 1991 during his effort to secure the release of four hostages in Lebanon?

8. Born in 1947, which flamboyant pop star was born Reginald Kenneth Dwight?

9. Which Central American country’s capital is San Jose?

10. What name is shared by a Leeds United and Scotland goalkeeper and a British show jumping champion, both competing at the top level in their chosen sports in the 70s?

11. What is the name of the accident prone lead character who is married to Berry and has a daughter named Jessica in a 1973 British sitcom?

12. Octopush, Hobbyhorsing, Ferret Legging and Shin Kicking are all what sort of activity?

13. Twin brothers Matt and Luke Goss formed which band in 1986 with their friends Craig Logan? Their first major success was the number 2 hit “When Will I Be Famous?”

14. Which actress is best known for her role as Else Garnett, the long-suffering wife of the racially bigoted and misogynistic character Alf Garnett in the BBC sitcom Till Death Us Do Part?

15. What is a small cap, akin to the biretta, worn in the Middle Ages by soldiers and ecclesiastics​ and also the name of a house building company in the UK?

16. What is the name of the northern part of the largest island of the Outer Hebrides archipelago in Scotland, frequently referred to as if it was a separate islands?

17. Which American director, writer, actor, comedian, producer and composer’s films include The Producers, Blazzing Saddles and Spaceballs?

18. What is Finland the largest drinker of (per capita), beating neighbouring Norway in to second place?

19. What are shallow places with good footing where a river or stream may be crossed by wading, or inside a vehicle getting its wheels wet?

20. What colective name is given to the series of English civile wars that lasted through many sporadic episodes between 1455 and 1487?

Categories
answers

a it’s not unusual quiz answers

The answers to a it’s not unusual quiz. If you’ve not done it yet, and want to, head over to that page before reading on.

The Snog, Fagan's, Sheffield

The Snog (again)

1. Best known for its 161 theatrical short films by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, which animated series centres on a friendship/rivalry (a love-hate relationship) between a cat, and a mouse?

Tom & Jerry

2. What is  the most widespread surname in Wales, borne by 5.75% of the population? 

Jones

3. Who are the  two incompetent detectives  in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé who provide much of the comic relief throughout the series?

Thompson & Thomson

4.What is the name of the Welsh footballer, born in 1965, who is famous for his “hard man” image? He has also appeared in films, such as Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, often typecast as criminal or villain characters.

Vinnie Jones

5. Who were founded by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman and controlled much of Southeastern Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries?

Ottomans

6. By what name is the event that  occurred in a  settlement in the South American nation of Guyana  on November 18, 1978, when more than 900 members of an American cult called the Peoples Temple died in a mass suicide-murder under the direction of their leader, commonly known?

Jonestown Massacre

7. Which character in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream provides comic relief throughout the play? A weaver by trade, he is famously known for getting his head transformed into that of a donkey by the elusive Puck.

Bottom

8. Whose catchphrases are “Don’t panic!”, “Permission to speak, sir?” and “They don’t like it up ’em!”, in a BBC TV sitcom that originally aired between 1968 and 1977?

Lance Corporal Jack Jone

9. What is the name of the South African instrumental kwela song that originally charted in the UK in 1958 and later, as a cover with added lyrics by Brighton based punk band The Piranhas in 1980?

Tom Hark

10. What are you said to be doing if you compare and attempt to emulate one’s neighbour’s social class or accumulation of material goods?

Keeping up with the Joneses

11. What is the former name of the British motoring association founded in 1905, now known simply by the initials of its old name?

Automobile Association

12. Born in 1930, which actress was most famous for starring in all 20 Carry On… films and also appeared in British TV sitcoms On the Up and As Time Goes By?

Joan Sims

13. How is the sensation that an amputated or missing limb is still attached usually known?

Phantom limb

14. First name Edwin, by what name is the driver of the title character more commonly known in the cut out animation television series Ivor the Engine?

Jones the Steam

15. The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s that uses a timer to break down work into intervals, named after the kitchen timer that he used as a university student. What food was his kitchen timer designed to resemble?

Tomato

16. Which imperfect piece of cockney rhyming slang appears to derive from the music hall song ’E Dunno Where ’E Are and means to be alone?

Jack Jones

17. Originating in Southern Italy as a lottery-style board game, but a variation of which is a popular form of raffle in the UK and elsewhere. What is it?

Tombola

18. By what name did sailors refer to the bottom of the seas, often in relation to drowned sailors and shipwrecks?

Davey Jones’ Locker

19. Create in the UK in 1991, what is the name of the theatrical percussion group that uses the body and ordinary objects to create a physical theatre performance using rhythms, acrobatics and pantomime?

Stomp

20. What was the title of the 1998 hit recorded by popular beat combo Space with guest vocalist Cerys Mathews of Catatonia fame?

The Ballad Of Tom Jones

Categories
quiz

a it’s not unusual quiz

It’s Sunday, week 199 of lockdown, or so it seems. Which means yet another week of no Fagan’s theme quiz. What? You do remember Fagan’s don’t you?

This week, the theme is taken form the fact that today (Sunday 7th) is the 80th birthday of an internationally famous Welsh singer. I think you’ll be able to work out who this is and what the them is pretty quickly.

Its the usual 20 questions, again. This week, I’m imagining Fagan’s – but it’s a bit of a hazy memory these days.

The theme alternates – blah, blah, blah.

There may be some “sound-a-likes” and embedded words.

The use of electronic devices to divine the answers, with the exception of hearing aids and pacemakers, is forbidden.

The Snog, Fagan's, Sheffield

The Snog (again)

1. Best known for its 161 theatrical short films by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, which animated series centres on a friendship/rivalry (a love-hate relationship) between a cat, and a mouse?

2. What is  the most   widespread surname   in Wales, borne by 5.75% of the population? 

3. Who are the  two incompetent detectives  in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé who provide much of the comic relief throughout the series?

4.What is the name of the Welsh footballer, born in 1965, who is famous for his “hard man” image? He has also appeared in films, such as Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, often typecast as criminal or villain characters.

5. Who were founded by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman and controlled much of Southeastern Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries?

6. By what name is the event that  occurred in a  settlement in the South American nation of Guyana  on November 18, 1978, when more than 900 members of an American cult called the Peoples Temple died in a mass suicide-murder under the direction of their leader, commonly known?

7. Which character in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream provides comic relief throughout the play? A weaver by trade, he is famously known for getting his head transformed into that of a donkey by the elusive Puck.

8. Whose catchphrases are “Don’t panic!”, “Permission to speak, sir?” and “They don’t like it up ’em!”, in a BBC TV sitcom that originally aired between 1968 and 1977?

9. What is the name of the South African instrumental kwela song that originally charted in the UK in 1958 and later, as a cover with added lyrics by Brighton based punk band The Piranhas in 1980?

10. What are you said to be doing if you compare and attempt to emulate one’s neighbour’s social class or accumulation of material goods?

11. What is the former name of the British motoring association founded in 1905, now known simply by the initials of its old name?

12. Born in 1930, which actress was most famous for starring in all 20 Carry On… films and also appeared in British TV sitcoms On the Up and As Time Goes By?

13. How is the sensation that an amputated or missing limb is still attached usually known?

14. First name Edwin, by what name is the driver of the title character more commonly known in the cut out animation television series Ivor the Engine?

15. The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s that uses a timer to break down work into intervals, named after the kitchen timer that he used as a university student. What food was his kitchen timer designed to resemble?

16. Which imperfect piece of cockney rhyming slang appears to derive from the music hall song ’E Dunno Where ’E Are and means to be alone?

17. Originating in Southern Italy as a lottery-style board game, but a variation of which is a popular form of raffle in the UK and elsewhere. What is it?

18. By what name did sailors refer to the bottom of the seas, often in relation to drowned sailors and shipwrecks?

19. Create in the UK in 1991, what is the name of the theatrical percussion group that uses the body and ordinary objects to create a physical theatre performance using rhythms, acrobatics and pantomime?

20. What was the title of the 1998 hit recorded by popular beat combo Space with guest vocalist Cerys Mathews of Catatonia fame?

Categories
answers

a the sun has got his hat on quiz answers

The answers to a the sun has got his hat on quiz. If you’ve not done it yet, and want to, head over to that page before reading on.

A Fagan’s breakfast

1. Which British newspaper ran with the following headlines: Gotcha; Freddie Starr Ate My Hamster and Werewolf Seized In Southend?

The Sun

2. How was Jack McVitie, posthumously known for triggering the imprisonment and downfall of the Kray twins, more commonly known?

Jack the Hat

3. What did ex-Smiths lead singer, Morrissey, think “everyday is like” in 1988 according go his number 9 hit single from his debut album?

Sunday

4. What term originated in cricket, later was transferred to ice hockey, soccer, and baseball and then to more general use and is also the magical sounding name of the TV company responsible for shows such as Drop three Dead Donkey, Father Ted, Room 101, Outnumbered and Have I Got News For You?

Hat Trick

5. What is the name of the American boxer who competed from 1953 to 1970, became the world heavyweight champion in 1962 after knocking out Floyd Patterson in the first round and eventually lost the title in 1964 to Muhammad Ali, who had entered the fight as a 7–1 underdog?

Sunny Liston

6. This British Labour politician, author and journalist from Sheffield was MP for Birmingham Sparkbrook for 33 years from 1964 to 1997 and served as Deputy Leader of the Labour Party for 9 years during that time. Who is he?

Roy Hattersley

7. What device for telling the time dates back to around 1500 BC, the time of Egyptian and Babylonian astronomy?

Sundial

8. What is a miniature version of an axe that only needs one hand to wield?

Hatchet

9. Which 1969 American Western film is based loosely on fact and tells the story of Wild West outlaws Robert LeRoy Parker and his partner Harry Longabaugh who are on the run from a crack US posse after a string of train robberies?

Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid

10. What is the collective name for the chemicals used as cleansing agents found in household cleaners, detergents, and even shampoo? Reasons for adding include to create a lathering effect to remove oil and dirt.

Sulphates

11. The biggest what occurred in Lituya Bay, Alaska on the night of July 9, 1958 following an earthquake along the Fairweather Fault in the Alaska Panhandle?

Tsunami

12. What is a casual conversation, often light in nature or of a gossipy nature, also know as small talk?

Chit-chat

13. Which British motor car manufacturer had its works at Moorfields in Blakenhall, a suburb of Wolverhampton in the county of Staffordshire? Two models dominated their production car line, known only by numbers which changed as small modifications were made each year. They also produced buses, aero engines, Grand Prix cars and two land speed record breaking cars.

Sunbeam

14. What is a young bird, reptile or fish that has recently emerged from an egg?

Hatchling

15. What happens every day in the UK but only once a year at the North Pole?

Sunrise (or sunset)

16. Who led the successful campaign for India’s independence from British Rule in 1947? His honorific title was first applied to him in 1914 in South Africa but is now used throughout the world.

Mahatma Gandhi

17. What phrase interrupted an Opera in the 1970s advert for the game, Battleships? It involved two well to-do gentlemen playing the game in an Opera house box and continually being told to sush by their accompanying wives. At the end, one of them stands up, having been defeated, and shouts this phrase.

You sunk my battleship

18. It can be a castle, a fortress, or stately residence, the largest of which is in France and has over 400 rooms and 85 staircases. What are these types of buildings called?

Chateau

19. Which song became a transatlantic hit for popular beat combo The Animals in 1965? The song was originally written for and recorded by Nina Simone a year earlier and has since been covered by many other artists.

Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood

20. “Two kids are stuck at home alone on a rainy day. An anthropomorphized cat appears with two strange companions at their door and wreak havoc, while the kids’ goldfish warns them of these bad characters. In the end, the cat uses a machine to clean up his chaotic mess, all before mom gets home.” was how the author imagined the story of which famous children’s book first published in 1957?

The Cat in the Hat

Categories
quiz

a the sun has got his hat on quiz

It’s Sunday, week 147 of lockdown, or so it seems. Which means yet another week of no Fagan’s theme quiz. Bet you could do with a big break about now, eh?

But, the sun has indeed be gracing us again, so I hope you’ve all been wearing your hat to avoid the forgotten effects of its rays.

Its the usual 20 questions, again. This week, I’m imagining Fagan’s begin pretty full as sun drenched punters make the most of a glorious weekend.

The theme alternates – blah, blah, blah.

There may be some “sound-a-likes” and embedded words.

The use of electronic devices to divine the answers, with the exception of hearing aids and pacemakers, is forbidden.

A Fagan’s breakfast

1. Which British newspaper ran with the following headlines: Gotcha; Freddie Starr Ate My Hamster and Werewolf Seized In Southend?

2. How was Jack McVitie, posthumously known for triggering the imprisonment and downfall of the Kray twins, more commonly known?

3. What did ex-Smiths lead singer, Morrissey, think “everyday is like” in 1988 according go his number 9 hit single from his debut album?

4. What term originated in cricket, later was transferred to ice hockey, soccer, and baseball and then to more general use and is also the magical sounding name of the TV company responsible for shows such as Drop three Dead Donkey, Father Ted, Room 101, Outnumbered and Have I Got News For You?

5. What is the name of the American boxer who competed from 1953 to 1970, became the world heavyweight champion in 1962 after knocking out Floyd Patterson in the first round and eventually lost the title in 1964 to Muhammad Ali, who had entered the fight as a 7–1 underdog ?

6. This British Labour politician, author and journalist from Sheffield was MP for Birmingham Sparkbrook for 33 years from 1964 to 1997 and served as Deputy Leader of the Labour Party for 9 years during that time. Who is he?

7. What device for telling the time dates back to around 1500 BC, the time of Egyptian and Babylonian astronomy?

8. What is a miniature version of an axe that only needs one hand to wield?

9. Which 1969 American Western film is based loosely on fact and tells the story of Wild West outlaws Robert LeRoy Parker and his partner Harry Longabaugh who are on the run from a crack US posse after a string of train robberies?

10. What is the collective name for the chemicals used as cleansing agents found in household cleaners, detergents, and even shampoo? Reasons for adding include to create a lathering effect to remove oil and dirt.

11. The biggest what occurred in Lituya Bay, Alaska on the night of July 9, 1958 following an earthquake along the Fairweather Fault in the Alaska Panhandle?

12. What is a casual conversation, often light in nature or of a gossipy nature, also know as small talk?

13. Which British motor car manufacturer had its works at Moorfields in Blakenhall, a suburb of Wolverhampton in the county of Staffordshire? Two models dominated their production car line, known only by numbers which changed as small modifications were made each year. They also produced buses, aero engines, Grand Prix cars and two land speed record breaking cars.

14. What is a young bird, reptile or fish that has recently emerged from an egg?

15. What happens every day in the UK but only once a year at the North Pole?

16. Who led the successful campaign for India’s independence from British Rule in 1947? His honorific title was first applied to him in 1914 in South Africa but is now used throughout the world.

17. What phrase interrupted an Opera in the 1970s advert for the game, Battleships? It involved two well to-do gentlemen playing the game in an Opera house box and continually being told to sush by their accompanying wives. At the end, one of them stands up, having been defeated, and shouts this phrase.

18. It can be a castle, a fortress, or stately residence, the largest of which is in France and has over 400 rooms and 85 staircases. What are these types of buildings called?

19. Which song became a transatlantic hit for popular beat combo The Animals in 1965? The song was originally written for and recorded by Nina Simone a year earlier and has since been covered by many other artists.

20. “Two kids are stuck at home alone on a rainy day. An anthropomorphized cat appears with two strange companions at their door and wreak havoc, while the kids’ goldfish warns them of these bad characters. In the end, the cat uses a machine to clean up his chaotic mess, all before mom gets home.” was how the author imagined the story of which famous children’s book first published in 1957?

Categories
answers

a better late than ever quiz answers

The answers to a better late than ever quiz. If you’ve not done it yet, and want to, head over to that page before reading on.

The back room at
Fagan’s, Sheffield

1. What is a fine-grained rock that is created by the alteration of shale or mudstone by low-grade regional metamorphism? It is popular for a wide variety of uses such as roofing, flooring, and flagging because of its durability and attractive appearance.

Slate

2. On which island do Peter Pan, Tinker Bell and the Lost Boys live?

Neverland

3. What is the contemporary English UK music TV show has been running in short series since 1992 and is a part of BBC 2’s late-night line-up, usually at around 11 pm to 12 midnight? It features a mixture of both established and new musical artists, from solo performers to bands and larger ensembles.

Later… with Jools Holland

4. What is the title of popular beat combo Nirvana ‘s 2nd studio album, released in 1991 that has sold over 340 millions copies to date?

Nevermind

5. What is the Cockney rhyming slang for feet?

Plates of meat

6. Which British sitcom that ran for eleven series from 7 September 1981 to 9 October 1991 starred Windsor Davies and Donald Sinden as rival antique dealers?

Never the Twain

7. This English actor and comedian – born in 1959 – Was a television regularly from the mid-1980s, most notably as a regular on the Channel 4 improvisation show “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” Who is he?

Tony Slatery

8. What is a loud noise that us repeated several times as an echo otherwise called?

Reverberation

9. In geology and physical geography what is an area of a highland, usually consisting of relatively flat terrain, that is raised significantly above the surrounding area, often with one or more sides with deep hills.? It is also know as a high plain or a tableland.

Plateau

10. Name the English actor, writer, and singer born in 1959 who has starred in films such as Another Country (1984), The Madness of King George (1994), Shrek 2 (2004) and Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (2016)?

Rupert Everett

11. Which CBS American late-night talk show first aired in August 1993 with host David Letterman and is now hosted by comedian Stephen Colbert and is filmed, when lockdown is not in operation,  originates from the Ed Sullivan Theater, New York?

The Late Show

12. What is a disease characterized by abnormally high body temperature or a condition of heightened activity or excitement: a fever of anticipation?

Fever

13. Singers Johnny Mathis and Deniece Williams released which song in 1978, reaching number 3 in the UK?

Too Much, Too Little, Too Late

14. What word described various liquids for drinking (some of which do not contain alcohol!) such as water, soda, tea, and coffee?

Beverage

15. What type of glass, initially produced in plane form, is commonly used for windows, glass doors, transparent walls, and windscreens? It is also used in hilarious classic comedy skits, being carried by two men and involving oncoming traffic.

Plate glass

16. What slang term describes and person who is intellectual in an annoying way?

Clever clogs

17. What term defines to protect something by interposing material that prevents the loss of heat or the intrusion of sound?

Insulate

18. Which British electrical firm formed in 1906 as the export branch of an American but became independent in 1914? For decades it dominated the UK consumer battery market.

Ever Ready

19. In which direction is something said to be moving if it moves towards the side or in a direction away from the middle but not backward or forward.

Laterally

20. What is the name of Harry Potter’s teacher, initially for Potions classes, then Defence Against the Dark Arts who finally became the Headmaster of Hogwarts school?

Severus Snape

Categories
quiz

a better late than ever quiz

It’s Sunday, week 99 of lockdown, or so it seems. Which means yet another week of no Fagan’s theme quiz.

Even I missed the last two weeks, hence this weeks theme.

Its the usual 20 questions, again. Just have to imagine the sounds, sights and smells of Fagan’s on a Sunday.

The theme alternates – hopefully, you’ll get the hang of it. You should have got how this works this by now.

There may be some “sound-a-likes” and embedded words.

The use of electronic devices to divine the answers, with the exception of hearing aids and pacemakers, is forbidden.

The back room at
Fagan’s, Sheffield

1. What is a fine-grained rock that is created by the alteration of shale or mudstone by low-grade regional metamorphism? It is popular for a wide variety of uses such as roofing, flooring, and flagging because of its durability and attractive appearance.

2. On which island do Peter Pan, Tinker Bell and the Lost Boys live?

3. What is the contemporary English UK music TV show has been running in short series since 1992 and is a part of BBC 2’s late-night line-up, usually at around 11 pm to 12 midnight? It features a mixture of both established and new musical artists, from solo performers to bands and larger ensembles.

4. What is the title of popular beat combo Nirvana ‘s 2nd studio album, released in 1991 that has sold over 340 millions copies to date?

5. What is the Cockney rhyming slang for feet ?

6. Which British sitcom that ran for eleven series from 7 September 1981 to 9 October 1991 starred Windsor Davies and Donald Sinden as rival antique dealers?

7. This English actor and comedian – born in 1959 – Was a television regularly from the mid-1980s, most notably as a regular on the Channel 4 improvisation show “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” Who is he?

8. What is a loud noise that us repeated several times as an echo otherwise called?

9. In geology and physical geography what is an area of a highland, usually consisting of relatively flat terrain, that is raised significantly above the surrounding area, often with one or more sides with deep hills.? It is also know as a high plain or a tableland.

10. Name the English actor, writer, and singer born in 1959 who has starred in films such as Another Country (1984), The Madness of King George (1994), Shrek 2 (2004) and Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (2016)?

11. Which CBS American late-night talk show first aired in August 1993 with host David Letterman and is now hosted by comedian Stephen Colbert and is filmed, when lockdown is not in operation,  originates from the Ed Sullivan Theater, New York?

12. What is a disease characterized by abnormally high body temperature or a condition of heightened activity or excitement: a fever of anticipation?

13. Singers Johnny Mathis and Deniece Williams released which song in 1978, reaching number 3 in the UK?

14. What word described various liquids for drinking (some of which do not contain alcohol!) such as water, soda, tea, and coffee?

15. What type of glass, initially produced in plane form, is commonly used for windows, glass doors, transparent walls, and windscreens? It is also used in hilarious classic comedy skits, being carried by two men and involving oncoming traffic.

16. What slang term describes and person who is intellectual in an annoying way?

17. What term defines to protect something by interposing material that prevents the loss of heat or the intrusion of sound?is a forcible indoctrination to induce someone to give up basic political, social, or religious beliefs and attitudes and to accept contrasting regimented ideas, often said to be used by religious cults?

18. Which British electrical firm formed in 1906 as the export branch of an American but became independent in 1914? For decades it dominated the UK consumer battery market.

19. In which direction is something said to be moving if it moves towards the side or in a direction away from the middle but not backward or forward.

20. What is the name of Harry Potter’s teacher, initially for Potions classes, then Defence Against the Dark Arts who finally became the Headmaster of Hogwarts school?

Categories
answers

a cleanliness quiz answers

The answers to a cleanliness quiz. If you’ve not done it yet, and want to, head over to that page before reading on.

The main room at
Fagan’s, Sheffield

1. What is the name of the rectangular bay and estuary at the north-west corner of East Anglia on the East coast of England, where Norfolk meets Lincolnshire, and both border the North Sea? It is fed by the rivers Witham, Welland, Nene and Great Ouse.

The Wash

2. What is the unit of measure, equal to 4 inches, used to measure the height of a horse at the highest point of the withers?

Hand

3. Who was the American political leader, military general, statesman, and founding father who served as president of the United States from 1789 to 1797?

George Washington

4. What is a type of reference work, or other collection of instructions, that is intended to provide ready reference? The term originally applied to a small or portable book containing information useful for its owner.

Handbook

5. What is a solution of lime and water used for painting walls or a victory by the same side in every game of a series?

Whitewash

6. What is traditionally a mixture of beer (usually a lager) and lemon-lime soda, most commonly a 50/50 ratio?

Shandy

7. Corsodyl Mint, Colgate Total Pro-Shield and Listerine Cool Mint are all types of what?

Mouthwash

8. Used by Samuel Pepys for his diary and Sir Isaac Newton for some of his notebooks, what is this sort of writing method commonly know as?

Shorthand

9. What is a thin plate with a hole that is normally used to distribute the load of a threaded fastener, such as a bolt or nut? Other uses are as a spacer, spring, wear pad, preload indicating device, locking device, and to reduce vibration.

Washer

10. What is a globally widespread, brief greeting or parting tradition between two people that is currently recommended to avoid? Alternative suggestions include elbow bump, Roman salute and the Namaste gesture?

Handshake

11. Released in 1976, what was the debut single by the American popular beat combo Rose Royce?

Car Wash

12. What are goods for sale, particularly those carrying branding designed to promote the seller, called?

Merchandise

13. Which word was formed around the mid-15th century from the two English nouns meaning “a type of swine, a pig” and “waste liquid or food refuse from a kitchen”?

Hogwash

14. What is the first name of Matthew Perry’s fictional character from the NBC sitcom Friends?

Chandler (Bing)

15. Also the name of a CBeebies children’s TV programme, what word also means “to engage in daring and romantic adventures with bravado or flamboyance”?

Swashbuckle

16. Which 1967 American prison drama film starred Paul Newman, for which he received an Oscar nomination?

Cool Hand Luke

17. What is a forcible indoctrination to induce someone to give up basic political, social, or religious beliefs and attitudes and to accept contrasting regimented ideas, often said to be used by religious cults?

Brainwash

18. What sport is played between two teams of seven players on a court measuring 40 by 20 metres with a goal at each end?

Handball

19. The Thor, introduced in 1908 by the Hurley Machine Company of Chicago, Illinois, and invented Alva J. Fisher, was the first electric-powered what?

Washing machine

20. Famous for his Messiah, Water Music and Music for the Royal Fireworks, which Baroque composer was born in Germany but spent most of his composing life in London?

George Frideric Handel

Categories
quiz

a cleanliness quiz

It’s Sunday, week 64 of lockdown, or so it seems. Which means yet another week of no Fagan’s theme quiz.

This week, another topical theme for your pleasure – cleanliness.

Its the usual 20 questions, again. You can almost believe you are in Fagan’s on a Sunday.

This week the theme alternates – hopefully, you’ll get the hang of it. Hint, it’s the same as last week!

There may be some “sound-a-likes” and embedded words.

The use of electronic devices to divine the answers, with the exception of hearing aids and pacemakers, is forbidden.

The main room at
Fagan’s, Sheffield

1. What is the name of the rectangular bay and estuary at the north-west corner of East Anglia on the East coast of England, where Norfolk meets Lincolnshire, and both border the North Sea? It is fed by the rivers Witham, Welland, Nene and Great Ouse.

2. What is the unit of measure, equal to 4 inches, used to measure the height of a horse at the highest point of the withers?

3. Who was the American political leader, military general, statesman, and founding father who served as president of the United States from 1789 to 1797?

4. What is a type of reference work, or other collection of instructions, that is intended to provide ready reference? The term originally applied to a small or portable book containing information useful for its owner.

5. What is a solution of lime and water used for painting walls or a victory by the same side in every game of a series?

6. What is traditionally a mixture of beer (usually a lager) and lemon-lime soda, most commonly a 50/50 ratio?

7. Corsodyl Mint, Colgate Total Pro-Shield and Listerine Cool Mint are all types of what?

8. Used by Samuel Pepys for his diary and Sir Isaac Newton for some of his notebooks, what is this sort of writing method commonly know as?

9. What is a thin plate with a hole that is normally used to distribute the load of a threaded fastener, such as a bolt or nut? Other uses are as a spacer, spring, wear pad, preload indicating device, locking device, and to reduce vibration.

10. What is a globally widespread, brief greeting or parting tradition between two people that is currently recommended to avoid? Alternative suggestions include elbow bump, Roman salute and the Namaste gesture?

11. Released in 1976, what was the debut single by the American popular beat combo Rose Royce?

12. What are goods for sale, particularly those carrying branding designed to promote the seller, called?

13. Which word was formed around the mid-15th century from the two English nouns meaning “a type of swine, a pig” and “waste liquid or food refuse from a kitchen”?

14. What is the first name of Matthew Perry’s fictional character from the NBC sitcom Friends?

15. Also the name of a CBeebies children’s TV programme, what word also means “to engage in daring and romantic adventures with bravado or flamboyance”?

16. Which 1967 American prison drama film starred Paul Newman, for which he received an Oscar nomination ?

17. What is a forcible indoctrination to induce someone to give up basic political, social, or religious beliefs and attitudes and to accept contrasting regimented ideas, often said to be used by religious cults?

18. What sport is played between two teams of seven players on a court measuring 40 by 20 metres with a goal at each end?

19. The Thor, introduced in 1908 by the Hurley Machine Company of Chicago, Illinois, and invented Alva J. Fisher, was the first electric-powered what?

20. Famous for his Messiah, Water Music and Music for the Royal Fireworks, which Baroque composer was born in Germany but spent most of his composing life in London?